Watch the burning of 50 Dalit Houses in Lathor , Dist. Bolagir in Orissa (Orissa Caste Atrocity). The dreams are burnt so easily, luckily someone recorded the program on his mobile. While the whereabouts of that person are still not known, somebody says he might have been beaten! Readers please find time to send this video to as many as possible. Also you may like to protest here by writing comments..>>

Come forward and help the victims..


In 2012, Gram Panchayat elections were held across the state of Maharashtra. Bankaranja village in Kaij taluka of Beed district had a 9-member Panchayat. In the elections of 2012, the people voted in 8 members belonging to the major front (BJP) and 1 member (Aruna Dahire)from the opposing front (NCP). As the post of Sarpanch in 2012 was reserved for a woman of Scheduled Caste (SC), Aruna Dahire the only elected SC female member of Bankaranja Gram Panchayat, became the Sarpanch against the wishes of the winning group which had no SC woman elected member.

Following Aruna’s election, on 16 January, 2013, Gram Sevak Balaji Rakh passed a proposal for approving the signature of Sarpanch Aruna Dahire for the Gram Panchayat’s transactions. The rest of the members took objection to this and passed a resolutionrejecting the Sarpanch’s signatory rights by majority vote. Aruna Dahire complained against

the same to the BDO (Gatvikas Adhikari), Panchayat Samiti- Kaij, and in panchayat meeting of 16/01/2013 gramsevak mentioned its legally required sarpanch to authorize financial transactions.

On 26 January, 2013, after the Gram Sabha meeting ended, at the Gram Panchayat office, Sudhakar Lamb and 10 others hurled casteist abuses like “हे महारीन तू सरपचं झ्हाल्यानेकाय होते?” (Oh Maharin, so what if you’ve become Sarpanch) at Aruna and her husb and Shrimant Dahire and roughed them up. The police did not register the Dahires’ complaint for 7-8 days. Following which the couple approached local activists Ashok Tangde and Manisha

Tokale of Dalit Adivasi Adhikar Abhiyan (DA3) who reside in Beed. The activists following a dharna and morcha, conducted a meeting with the Collector. On the Collector’s intervention, an FIR was finally registered on 6 February, 2013 against 11 people including gram panchayat members under the Prevention of Atrocities Act.

Following this, a compromise was arrived at a village meeting, where Aruna and her husband were ‘requested’ to take back the FIR on the promise of the cooperation of other Gram Panchayat members to Aruna’s leadership as Sarpanch. On 12 February, 2013, following the compromise, Shrimant Dahire signed a bond taking back his complaint, which was then forwarded to the Police. The police abandoned the investigation on Aruna’s FIR on the basis of the affidavit by Aruna and her husband Shrimant.

Following the compromise, Aruna tried to initiate several development initiatives for the village (2 road construction projects, etc.) However, she was obstructed in one way or the other due to non-cooperation of other Panchayat Samiti members. Until date, the only work she has been able to complete, that too only due to her grit and courage has been a road built in the main village. Development works for the Dalit colony in the village were not even allowed to be spoken of in the Gram Panchayat meetings. Moreover, the Gram Sevak on more than one occasion got her to sign blank cheques. Everytime she protested they would intimidate her and ask her to remain within limits. Each time this occurred, Aruna has submitted written complaints to the BDO apprising him of the situation. The BDO never initiated any action against the accused; however, Aruna continued to register complaints to him.

Aruna Dahire

Pic01: Aruna Dahire Fighting for her dignity

Finally, seeing the insubordination of Aruna Dahire and assertion of her own power, the major front instigated the resignation of one of its own upper caste female members and got a Scheduled Caste woman, Maya Dahire, re-elected in the vacant place through by-elections. Following her election, the members of the Panchayat Samiti passed a no-confidence motion against Aruna Dahire seeking to elect Maya Dahire in her place, and during the meeting on 22 June, 2016, Aruna and her husband were beaten up by Madhukar Lamb and 9 others.

Fact Finding Report of Dalit Women Sarpanch


The unrest over the brutal assault on Dalits in Gujarat’s Una last week, for allegedly skinning a cow, led to two deaths in Saurashtra on Tuesday. One protester was reported to have committed suicide over the episode, while a head constable was killed in clashes between a mob and police.

The case is not new in PM Narendra Modi’s Gujarat. There is a Gurakshak Samiti which is in operation has links with RSS-BJP. The Samiti is a militia  that violently kills lower caste poor Dalits in India. The traditional caste system has driven Dalits into occupation of selling  cow hide. This is India where upper caste do not want to give them opportunity yet they will kill them when they are enagaged into caste work.

SEVEN MEMBERS of a Dalit family were allegedly beaten up by a group of gau rakshaks for skinning a dead cow in Una town of Gir Somnath district in Gujarat on Monday. Three of the alleged attackers were arrested on Tuesday.

A purported video of the victims being attacked with iron rods and sticks was circulated on social media. In the video, some of the victims are seen tied to a car, while the accused are beating them up.

Police said the incident occurred around 10 am on Monday, when Balu Sarvaiya, a 46-year-old resident of Mota Samadhiyala village in Una taluka, and some of his family members were skinning the carcass. In his complaint, Balu’s son Vashram (26) said they had brought the carcass from Bediya village. “The accused came in a white car and asked why we were slaughtering the cow. I told them that the cow was dead and that we were merely removing its skin. But they started abusing us and attacked us with iron pipes, sticks and a knife with which we were removing the skin of the carcass,” Vashram said in his complaint.

The other victims have been identified as Balu’s wife Kunvarben, their other son, Ramesh (23), and relatives Bechar Sarvaiya (30), Ashok Sarvaiya (20) and Deveshi Babariya (32).

Source: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/gujarat-7-of-dalit-family-beaten-up-for-skinning-dead-cow-2910054/


While the entire nation mourned the CRPF men who were killed in the militant attack at Pampore on Saturday, an unseemly display of caste prejudice halted constable Vir Singh’s funeral at his village, Nagla Kewal in Shikohabad, Firozabad district.

Upper castes of the village refused to allow a public land to be used for the cremation of the slain soldier, who is from the Nat(acrobats) community. It was only after the intervention of district officials that villagers agreed to give up a 10 by 10 metre plot for the last rites.

martyr

Pic01: Martyr, Vir Singh Died for Nation that does not allow a  funeral

The incident took place on Sunday afternoon, when the family of the slain soldier wished to erect a statue of him near village road at a public land, where every year local fair takes place during festive times.

Speaking to TOI, the gram Pradhan of the village, Vijay Singh of Kanthari gram panchayat said, “In the morning, the local villagers had raised objections over martyred soldier’s family’s demand to cremate his body on public land and then erect a statue of him. But later, after long hours of talk with SDM, the villagers agreed to respect the family demand.”

 

 The 52-year-old Vir Singh was the sole bread earner of his family, who joined CRPF in 1981. His family stays in approximate 500 sq foot one room set home with tin shed as roof. He left behind his three children, including a 22-year daughter (Rajni) who is pursuing MSc and two sons – 18-year-old son (Ramandeep) pursuing BSc and 16-year-old (Sandeep) who just cleared intermediate.
Source: TOI

A day after a Dalit man was killed on a busy street in Udumalaipettai town of Tamil Nadu’s Tirupur district, the father-in-law of the victim surrendered before a court in Dindigul on Monday and claimed responsibility for the murder.

 

Six teams have been formed to look for the assailants. Udumalaipttai’s DSP Vivekanandan said although there were several witnesses, not many have been helpful in giving a firsthand account of the assailants. “We are still looking for more witnesses. We will make arrests soon,” he said.

On Monday, the police said they are looking for a five-member gang, against the three bikers who were initially thought to have carried out the daylight fatal attack on V Shankar, 22, and left his wife Kausalya, 19, severely injured. The police claimed to have intensified the search operations based on witness accounts and CCTV footage of the incident, which took place around 3 pm near Udumalaipettai bus stand.

Kausalya’s maternal uncle and his son, an engineering student, were taken into custody on Sunday night and are being interrogated, the police said.

Meanwhile, PTI reports that Kausalya, who is hospitalised in Coimbatore, has blamed her father for the murderous attack on Shankar and said she will be in a position to identify the culprits.

 

More: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/dalit-youths-murder-girls-father-surrenders-video-of-attack-goes-viral/


Rohith Vemula
An unfinished portrait


His mother’s adoption into an upper caste family which treated her as a servant contributed to what Rohith called “the fatal accident” of his birth

By Sudipto Mondal

T

he backstory of Rohith Vemula’s life starts in the town of Guntur in the summer of 1971, 18 years before he was born. That was the year Anjani Devi – Rohith’s adoptive “grandmother” – triggered the events that the scholar would later describe cryptically as the “fatal accident of my birth” in his suicide note.

“It was around lunchtime. The sun was very hot and a few children were playing under the neem tree outside our house in Prashanth Nagar (Guntur). I spotted a really beautiful little baby girl among them. She was barely able to walk. She must have been a little more than one,” Anjani tells HT. That little girl was Rohith’s mother, Radhika.

Cursing the local Telugu media for suggesting Rohith might not have been a Dalit, she continues to narrate the story in faultless English. “The baby belonged to a migrant labourer couple that was working on the railway tracks outside our house. I had just lost a baby girl. I was reminded of my own girl.”

Strangely, Radhika, sitting beside, doesn’t speak a word of English. In fact, Anjani’s English appears better than Rohith’s.

Anjani says she asked the labourer couple to “give” her the child and they “happily agreed”. She says there is no record of the transaction. “As simply as that”, little Radhika became the “daughter” of the house, Anjani Devi claims.

“Caste? What is caste? I am a Vaddera (OBC). Radhika’s parents were Mala (Scheduled Caste). I never bothered about her caste. She was like my own daughter. I married her to a man from my caste,” Anjani says and explains how she achieved the feat of the inter-caste marriage between Radhika and Mani Kumar.

Rohith Vemula (in blue a shirt) with his friends, including Sheikh Riyaz during their BSC days in Guntur. Riyaz says Rohith, his siblings and his mother were treated no better than servants at his adoptive grandmother's house. (Photo provided by Sheikh Riyaz)
Rohith Vemula (in blue a shirt) with his friends, including Sheikh Riyaz during their BSC days in Guntur. Riyaz says Rohith, his siblings and his mother were treated no better than servants at his adoptive grandmother’s house. (Photo provided by Sheikh Riyaz)
“I had a talk with Mani’s grandfather who was a respected man from the Vaddera community. We agreed that we will keep Radhika’s caste a secret and not tell Mani about it,” she says.

Nileema, the eldest, Rohith in the middle and Raja, the youngest – all three children were born in the first five years of the marriage. Mani was violent with her and irresponsible from the beginning, Radhika says. “A few slaps were a common thing when he was drunk,” she says.

Caste? What is caste? I am a Vaddera (OBC). Radhika’s parents were Mala (Scheduled Caste). I never bothered about her caste. She was like my own daughter. I married her to a man from my caste

– Anjani Devi, Rohith’s adoptive grandmother

In the fifth year of marriage, Mani found out Radhika’s secret.

“Somebody in our Vaddera colony in Prashanth Nagar leaked the secret to him that Radhika is an adopted Mala girl. That’s when he started beating her very badly,” Anjani says. Confirming this, Radhika says, “Mani was always abusive. But after he discovered my caste, he became even more violent. He would beat me almost every day and curse his luck for being cheated into marrying an untouchable.”


Read more | India’s on fire: Letter to Rohith from his transgender friend


Anjani Devi claims, she “rescued” her daughter and grandchildren from Mani Kumar. “They left Mani and I welcomed them back into my house in 1990,” she says.

A different picture emerged when HT visited Rohith’s birthplace in Guntur and met Sheikh Riyaz, Rohith’s best friend and BSc classmate. Radhika and Raja say Riyaz knows more about Rohith than even they do.

When Raja got engaged to a girl last month, Riyaz performed the rituals that Rohith was supposed to as elder brother. Rohith couldn’t attend the ceremony because of the trouble on the HCU campus.

A poster of Rohith Vemula at the Hyderabad Central University campus. Rohith's PhD meant much more to him than a mere degree. In the past, he had worked as a construction labourer and a catering boy to fund his education.
A poster of Rohith Vemula at the Hyderabad Central University campus. Rohith’s PhD meant much more to him than a mere degree. In the past, he had worked as a construction labourer and a catering boy to fund his education.
Riyaz is practically family and says he knows exactly why Rohith was lonely in his childhood, why he says in his farewell letter, “Maybe I was wrong, all the while, in understanding the world. In understanding love, pain, life, death”.

“Radhika aunty and her children lived in her mother’s house like servants. They were expected to do all the work in the house while the others sat around. Radhika aunty has been doing household work ever since she was a little girl,” Riyaz reveals. If the Child Labour Act had been in force in 1970s, Anjani Devi, the so-called mother of Radhika, could have been charged with keeping a child as domestic help.

Radhika was 14 in 1985 when she was married off to Mani Kumar. Child marriage had been illegal for more than 50 years by that time. Radhika was around 12 or 13 when she discovered to her shock that she was an adopted child and a Mala. “Anjani’s mother, who was still alive then, had badly beaten Radhika and abused her. She was crying near my house. When I asked, she said her grandmother had called her a ‘Mala b****’ for not doing housework and cursed Anjani for bringing her into the house,” says Uppalapaty Danamma, 67.

Radhika aunty and her children lived in her mother’s house like servants. They were expected to do all the work in the house while the others sat around. Radhika aunty has been doing household work ever since she was a little girl

– Sheikh Riyaz, Rohith’s friend

Having seen Rohith’s mother since she was a little girl, Danamma is one of the oldest residents of the neighbourhood, a Dalit leader and former municipal councillor. Her recently refurbished house is at the border that separates the Mala Dalit colony from the Vaddera colony.


Read more | Rohith Vemula: Death of a philosopher


Several other neighbours in the Vaddera colony of Prashanth Nagar said the general perception was that Radhika was a servant girl. One Vaddera resident sounded annoyed with Anjani and told HT that by cheating Mani Kumar and marrying him to Radhika, a Dalit, Anjani had cheated the entire Vaddera community.

“Rohith would hate to go to his grandmother’s house because every time they went, his mother would start working like a maid,” Riyaz says. He says in Radhika’s absence, her children would have to take over the housework. This practice of summoning Rohith’s family for housework continued even after they moved into an independent one-room house a kilometre away.

Throughout his BSc degree in Guntur, Rohith rarely used to go home. He hated it. He used to stay with Riyaz and two other boys in a tiny bachelor pad. He paid for things by working as a construction labourer and catering boy. He distributed pamphlets and worked in exhibitions.

***

Anjani has four biological children. Two daughters were born after Radhika came into the family. One son is an engineer and the other a civil contractor. One daughter is a BSc-BEd and the other daughter a BCom-BEd.

The civil contractor is also a well known name in the growing city’s real estate business. He also has close ties to Rajya Sabha MP from the TDP, N Harikrishna, a leader whose lineage goes back to Telugu cinema icon and former Andhra CM, NT Rama Rao.

One of the daughters is married to a successful criminal lawyer in Guntur. Anjani Devi is even more educated than her biological daughters. She has an MA and MEd and was the headmaster of a municipal corporation-run high school in Guntur town. Her husband was a chief engineer in the government. Theirs is one of the oldest and biggest houses in Prakash Nagar.

As somebody who taught teenage schoolgirls, Anjani would in all probability have known what the legal marriageable age was when she married off the 14-year-old Radhika. She was an educationist but denied education to the girl she describes as her “own daughter”. For her biological daughters and sons, however, she reserved the best.

Rohith's adoptive grandmother Anjani Devi's house in Prashanth Nagar. While Anjani Devi adopted Rohith's mother as a child, she emerges at best as a benevolent employer than a caring mother.
Rohith’s adoptive grandmother Anjani Devi’s house in Prashanth Nagar. While Anjani Devi adopted Rohith’s mother as a child, she emerges at best as a benevolent employer than a caring mother.
It explains why Anjani speaks faultless English and her ‘daughter’ and ‘grandsons’ don’t. Anjani Devi was kind enough to let a Dalit servant girl stay in the house. She even allowed the child to call her ‘mother’. But Anjani Devi emerges at best a benevolent employer and not a caring mother.


Read more | Rohith’s suicide: Is Modi losing touch with the youth?


Rohith was secretive about his personal life when he moved to HCU for his MSc and PhD. Even his closest friends did not know the entire family history. Everybody knew bits and pieces. Ramji, his closest friend and ASA comrade, knew Rohith had done menial jobs to make ends meet. But he did not know that his “grandmother” was a well off woman. None of the HCU students, many of them close friends of Rohith’s, knew anything about the darkest chapters of his life that he wasn’t even willing to reveal in his death note.

Before speaking to Anjani for the second time, HT spoke to Raja Vemula for permission to run this story. His first reaction was that of shock and he wanted to know how we found out. When he learnt the names of all the people HT spoke to in Guntur, he broke down and said, “Yes this is our truth. This is the truth that my brother and I would want to hide the most. We felt ashamed to reveal that the woman we call ‘grandma’ (in English) is actually our master.”

Raja narrates a few chapters from his own life that give a sense of what Rohith must have gone through. He says he got the 11th rank in the Andhra University MSc entrance exam and joined the course. Two months later, he got the results of Pondicherry University, considered better, and he wanted to shift there.

“Andhra University wanted me to pay Rs 6,000 for the transfer certificate. I had no money and my grandmother’s family did not help. I had no option but to ask my Andhra University friends for help. Some of them gave me Rs 5 and 10. That was 2011. It was the first time in my life that I felt like a worthless beggar,” Raja says.

When he first landed in Pondicherry, Raja slept in an ashram for destitute AIDS patients for nearly 20 days. “Then, a senior of mine, who lived outside the campus in an independent house, took me as a domestic help. I would do the housework and he would let me sleep in his house,” Raja says.

Raja talks about the one time he spent five days without food in Pondicherry. “All my college mates were quite well off. They would bring pizzas and burgers from outside campus and nobody would even ask me why I was looking weak. Everybody there knew that I was starving,” he says.

Andhra University wanted me to pay Rs 6,000 for the transfer certificate. I had no money and my grandmother’s family did not help. I had no option but to ask my Andhra University friends for help. It was the first time in my life that I felt like a worthless beggar

– Raja Vemula, Rohith’s brother

Despite the deprivation, he scored 65% in his MSc first year and 70% in his final year. But why did his grandmother not come to his rescue? “You should ask her this question,” Raja says.

***

When HT met Anjani once again, she was staying at an HCU professor’s house on campus along with Radhika and Raja. Raja didn’t want to be part of the meeting and waited outside.

Asked how she speaks better English than her ‘daughter’, Anjani says Radhika is “not very intelligent”. Asked how her own children are all graduates while Rohith’s mother was married off at 14, she says, “We found a rich boy from a good family, so we arranged the marriage.” She claims she did not know that Mani Kumar had a bad reputation. Anjani claims that Radhika did not want to study further.

Riyaz shows the one room tenement where Rohit lived with his siblings and mother. Even though both Rohith and Raja were academically brilliant, they had to scrounge to make ends meet. Their grandmother's family never came forward with financial help.
Riyaz shows the one room tenement where Rohit lived with his siblings and mother. Even though both Rohith and Raja were academically brilliant, they had to scrounge to make ends meet. Their grandmother’s family never came forward with financial help.
But by this time, Riyaz had already set the record straight. “Radhika aunty returned to education through her children. By learning their school lessons herself before teaching them at home,” he says. Radhika finished her graduation along with her sons.

“When Rohith was in final year BSc, Radhika aunty was doing her second year BA and Raja was in BSc first year. First Rohith passed, next year it was aunty and the year after that Raja passed. We all used to study together sometimes. Once we all had exams on the same day,” Riyaz recalls.

When Anjani is presented with specific instances and asked why she and her biological family did not help with the education of her two academically brilliant “grandchildren”, she gives this reporter a long stare before finally saying, “I don’t know.”

Was Rohith Vemula’s family treated like servants in her house? “I don’t know,” Anjani says again. “Who told you all this? Your plan is to get me into trouble, right?”

Anjani did not dispute a single fact that HT collected from Guntur. After a point she lowered her eyes and indicated she wanted this reporter to leave.

Rohith’s happiest days were spent in the company of his best friend Riyaz.

Riyaz took HT on a tour of their favourite haunts, the sites of their many adventures. In six hours spent criss-crossing Guntur, it seemed every street had a Rohith-Riyaz story.

The parties, the teenage crushes, failed Valentine’s Day proposals, brawls over girls, movies, music, boy gang parties, English music, footballer hairstyles — things Rohith was seeing for the first time.

Riyaz insists he was always the sidekick and Rohith the hero. “This one time, he was thrown out of a class because he was asking too many questions of a teacher who couldn’t answer them. The principal, who knew about Rohith’s brilliance, intervened on his side and asked the teacher to prepare better for the class,” Riyaz says.

Rohith had a good knowledge of the internet. He would often prove to teachers that their syllabus was outdated. He knew science websites that the teachers didn’t. He was always ahead of the class, Riyaz says.

He says that there were only a few casteist elements on campus and most of the teachers were secular at the Hindu College in Guntur.

“The distractions aside, Rohith’s life was about just two things: finding part-time jobs and spending time on the internet. He was a huge fan of Julian Assange and used to spend hours with the Wikileaks files,” says Riyaz. When he finished his BSc, Rohith was spoilt for postgraduate options.


Read more | Lal Salaam to Jai Bhim: Why Rohith Vemula left Marxists


His PhD course was not meant just for a certificate. His research was a combination of social sciences and technology. A lot of his knowledge of the social sciences, Riyaz says, came from his association with groups like ASA and SFI which place a lot of emphasis on their cadres reading political theory.

Rohith called Riyaz a week before he died. “He told me he was afraid he would have to discontinue his PhD. He said the opposition ABVP was too strong as they had the support of MPs and MLAs, ministers as well as the university management. He had given up hope of victory,” Riyaz says.

Rohith Vemula's entry in Sheikh Riyaz's slam book. Riyaz says that Rohith fought against the caste discrimination he faced while growing up. He broke many barriers before he got to the final stretch, his PhD. He gave up when he realised he could go no further. (Photo provided by Sheikh Riyaz)
Rohit Vemula’s entry in Sheikh Riyaz’s slam book. hRiyaz says that Rohith fought against the caste discrimination he faced while growing up. “He broke many barriers before he got to the final stretch, his PhD. He gave up when he realised he could go no further. (Photo provided by Sheikh Riyaz)
The two friends talked for a long time and slowly Rohith’s mood started improving when they started discussing a business plan they had hatched six months ago with three other close friends in Guntur. “We will start a business and rule Guntur,” Rohith said in that conversation.

He kept repeating in that phone call that the PhD was most important to him not because it would lead to a career but because he wanted to break fresh ground with his research, Riyaz says.

…the value of a man was reduced to his immediate identity and nearest possibility. To a vote. To a number. To a thing. Never was a man treated as a mind. As a glorious thing made up of star dust. In every field, in studies, in streets, in politics, and in dying and living

– Rohith Vemula’s suicide note

Did a lifetime of unequal treatment add to the conditions at the university in leading Rohith to take his own life?

“His family story haunted Rohith all his life,” Riyaz says. “He faced caste discrimination in the house where he grew up. But instead of succumbing, Rohith fought it out. He broke many barriers before he got to the final stretch, his PhD. He gave up when he realised he could go no further.”

After all his battles, in his own words, Rohith gave up when he realised that “the value of a man was reduced to his immediate identity and nearest possibility. To a vote. To a number. To a thing. Never was a man treated as a mind. As a glorious thing made up of star dust. In every field, in studies, in streets, in politics, and in dying and living.”

***

Source: Hindustan Times


Five Research Scholars (Ph.D students) at University of Hyderabad are ostracized by the decision of the University to restrict their entry in to hostels, administration building and other common places in groups and denial of permission to participate in Students’ Union elections, as an administrative response to the incidents related to ASA vs ABVP on 03.08.2015. This decision of suspension was arrived at by the Executive Council, the apex body of the University, without conducting any enquiry. Isn’t this similar to a dominant caste ostracizing a Dalit-household from the village? Here, 5 senior research scholars who happen to be from Dalit background are outcast from the day-to-day activities of the university space.
Order of Suspension of Dalit Research Scholars, barring their entry into common places in groups, Administrative Buildings, hostels and their participation in Students’ Union Elections
The said decision is against the orders of vice-chancellor which revoked the earlier suspension and reserved the right to investigate the incidents that happened on 03/08/2015 and 04/08/2015 afresh.
What happened on 03.08.2015
On 3-8-2015, our organization was informed that some intolerant person had passed bad comments on Facebook calling ASA as goons. On investigation, it was learnt that Mr.Susheel Kumar, President ABVP-HCU Unit, posted the following update: “ASA goons are talking about hooliganism”.
ABVP President’s statement on ASA terming Ambedkarites as Goons
When asked him about the same, he replied : “Since you have organized a protest against ABVP’s hooliganism in Delhi University against disruption of the screening of Muzaffarnagar Baaqi Hain, against ASA’s protest, i posted terming ASA as goons”. However, part of the reply was refuted, since we hadn’t used the term ‘hooliganism’, but condemned the attack by ABVP on Montage Film Society.
Since, such posting was demeaning in the manner in which an Ambedkarite organization was categorised as consisting of goons, we asked for a written apology to ASA. Subsequently, he apologized in writing in presence of Security officials. After receiving the apology we left the place.
rohit-01

Pic 01: Social boycott: The picture taken while Rohith was forced to vacate the hostel. Next, he was forced to commit suicide by the ABVP goons and BJP casteist forces (incudes VC, Smriti Irani and Bandaru Dattatreya)..

The issue took a different shape by the next morning i.e., on 4-8-2015. The said ABVP President, along with his brother who is a member of Bharatiya Janata Yuva Morcha, went to a private hospital and started a melodrama. In the meantime, members of ABVP along with BJYM cadres spread false allegations against the suspended students. In that process, BJP MLC, Mr. Ramachandra Rao met the Vice-Chancellor along with some of his party cadre. He insisted the Vice-Chancellor should take action against the Dalit students, terming them as anti-national. Later, an Enquiry Committee was constituted by Professor R.P Sharma, former Vice-Chancellor, under the chairmanship of Professor Alok Pandey.
The committee submitted its report; ironically the final decision of the proctorial board contradicted this diametrically with its own findings. To quote the findings:
1) “The Board could not get any hard evidence of beating of Mr.Susheel Kumar either from Mr Krishna Chaitnya or from the reports submitted by Dr. Anupama. Dr. Anupama’s reports also could not link or suggest that the surgery of the Sushil Kumar is the direct result of the beating.”
2) “According to DSO, Mr. Dilip Singh, who was the first to reach to the spot, there was a big gathering of ASA cadres discussing with Sushil Kumar. When asked about the beating, he told that he didn’t witness any beating of Mr. Susheel Kumar during his presence.”
3) “Mr. Krishna Chaitanya could not present any hard evidence of Mr. Sushil Kumar’s beating in support of his letter.”
4) “It was clear from all depositions that Mr. Susheel Kumar posted the said comments on facebook and ASA people went to Mr. Susheel’s room to seek apology and for the removal of the post.”
5) This whole argument ended with the apology letter of Mr. Susheel Kumar.
On the one hand, in the findings, the Medical officer was quoted to have said there was no hard beating of Mr. Susheel Kumar; he could also not link the medical surgery for appendicitis which Susheel Kumar had undergone to the incident or was a direct result of beating. Duty Security Officer also has confirmed that there was no beating.
Proctorial board findings and decisions
But the final decision of the proctorial board contradicted diametrically with its own finding, to quote:
“Based on the Medical officer report (explained by Dr. Anupama), main complainant Susheel Kumar’s deposition and pictures by him and the depositions of two eyewitnesses (names are kept confidential) of the incident, it was evidently cleared that Mr.Susheel Kumar was abused, manhandled, beaten, forced to write apology letter by a group of more than 30 students, lead by Prashant. The main and most active students involved and named by the complainant and mostly confirmed by eyewitnesses, in abusing and hitting are Prashant, Rohit, Seshu, Vijay and Sunkanna”
Final Decision of Proctorial Board on Suspension of Five Dalit Research Scholars
Immediately following the decision on suspension a protest was organized by ASA, and in an open discussion with former Vice-Chancellor, Professor R.P Sharma on the fallacies of enquiry and decision taken, he immediately revoked the suspension, subject to constitution of a new committee to enquire into the incidents afresh.
Revocation of the Suspension of Students
However, the present Vice-Chancellor, Professor Podile Apparao has not ordered any fresh enquiry, and has kept the suspended students in dark about formation of a committee from Executive Council. Subsequently he took a decision of suspension of entry into hostels, common places in groups, administrative building, and sent notices to vacate the rooms immediately.
From the entire episode it is clear that, Dalit Research Scholars were victimized on account of political pressure from BJP and right-wing forces prompting these actions of the present Vice-Chancellor, who negated the natural principles of Justice and violated the SC/ST (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, in a rushed attempt to show his allegiance to BJP and ABVP.
Source: Endosmosis WG

Hissar: Haryana

Her Hindi exam was scheduled for 18 September 2012, nine days after they raped her. There were 12 of them; eight raped her, four stood guard and someone thought it would be fun to make a video.

Dabra village, where she lived, is less than 15km from the township of Hisar, her nani’s home. The girl took a shared autorickshaw and was walking the remainder of the short distance when a car with eight men crammed inside stopped. She was pulled in. They took her to a secluded stone shelter adjoining the fields where they were joined by four others on motorcycles.

Ironically, it was the video clip that eventually led to the arrest of the eight who were visible in it (the other four who couldn’t be seen were never arrested). Four of those eight were sentenced eight months later by a sessions court to life imprisonment. Four were acquitted for lack of evidence. Outraged and angry, her father, a gardener, wanted to lodge a first information report with the police. According to a fact-finding report facilitated by the National Campaign on Dalit Human Rights (NCDHR), the father was told by Dabra village elders that if he persisted, the boys would make the video public. Some reports suggest that the father was even shown the video. Later that day, he drank pesticide and killed himself.

Dabra erupted in protest. For three days, members of the Dalit community, to which the girl belongs, refused to cremate the father’s body until arrests were made. Finally, on 21 September, the police arrested eight of those accused—all higher caste boys from the Jat community. A day later, the father was cremated.

The girl’s next paper, English, was scheduled for 24 September and it is a testimony to her courage that she appeared for it. “I got over 65% in it,” she says, allowing herself a small smile. When she finally cleared all papers, she did so with a first division..

More: http://www.livemint.com/Politics/PMF55ELc9vu5cfTGlqA4RI/The-high-price-of-dreaming.html